Top 10 different types of memories, there are things in our brain

Memory is a fairly important thing in everyday life to remember where you put your keys or how to walk without falling. Of course, there are plenty of tips and memory exercises to maintain your brain, but if you’re not too stupid, it should work on its own. There are plenty of memory types that make this whole mess work and it’s really interesting to know all about it. You will fall asleep less stupid tonight.

short term memory

1. Immediate memory (or working memory)

Short-term memory is memory for the present. Most everyday information (remembering a phone number for a few seconds to dial it, for example) first goes through short-term memory and if you want to retain it for a long time, you have to store it in long-term memory. term.

Immediate memory (also called working memory) is the ability to use and manipulate information that remains in short-term memory. It is thanks to this that we manage to listen to a lesson and take notes at the same time.

long term memory

2. Semantic memory

Semantic memory is the one we use the most in school: it is the memory of historical facts and concepts. It allows us to store general knowledge about ourselves and the world around us. It is thanks to this memory that we can answer questions like “What is this object called?” », « Who won the First World War? or “What’s your favorite color?” “.

All this information is organized in a semantic network, which means that the information never disappears but that it may be difficult to find the node where it is.

3. Procedural memory

In the long-term memory are stored knowledge, of course, but also know-how. Procedural memory (also called motor memory) is the memory of automatisms, the one that allows us to do things like walk, talk or write without having to relearn each time.

It is said to be the memory of the implicit because the execution of gestures does not require any particular mental effort. When riding a bicycle, for example, the process is carried out unconsciously.

4. Episodic memory

Episodic memory is used to store personally experienced events and their context. Thanks to this, we can “travel” mentally in time and space by remembering the places we have been and the people we have met. You can also project yourself into the future by imagining your next vacation, for example.

This memory is formed between the ages of 3 and 5 and can sometimes be disturbed because of traumas experienced during childhood. It is also this memory that is most affected by retrograde amnesia.

5. Perceptual memory

Perceptual memory (also called sensory memory) is the memory of sensations experienced through our five senses. It stores thousands of information without context such as images, sounds or smells and episodic memory then takes care of associating all this information with memories. It is through perceptual memory that we can recognize faces or remember the way home.

Learn more about perceptual memory:

6. Visual memory

Visual perceptions represent 80% of the information transmitted to the brain and stored in long-term memory, which is why the majority of people have a highly developed visual memory. If you manage to retain information from a text by reading it several times and you have a good memory for faces, your visual memory is well developed.

7. Auditory memory

Auditory memory stores sounds such as voices, laughter, music or various noises. People with a highly developed auditory memory learn better by listening to a lesson than by reading it and are often more sensitive to noise.

8. Olfactory memory

The human being has more than 40 million olfactory receptors in the nose, this is how we can recognize the different smells in our environment. This memory is often unconscious but sometimes it is associated with a memory: the smell of a cake or a plant can cause the reminiscence of a very buried childhood memory.

9. Touch Memory

Tactile memory (also called kinesthetic memory) is the memory of textures. Thanks to touch receptors, all nervous information such as temperature, movements or shapes of the object are transmitted to the brain. It is through kinesthetic memory that you can remember how warm your skin felt in the sun or how soft your cat’s hair felt.

10. The memory of taste

The memory of taste comes from the stimuli of the gustatory system but the perceptions provoked last only a few seconds. As they are reactivated each time our palate is confronted with this taste, we end up instantly recognizing the food.

When you see a food with a very sour taste like a lemon or a prickly candy, you can have a feeling of acidity in your mouth. If this has ever happened to you, your memory of taste is quite well developed.


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