Justice for George Floyd: how to help and donate worldwide

Justice for George Floyd: how to help and donate worldwide

On May 25, George Floyd, 46, an unarmed black man, died after Derek Chauvin, a white Minneapolis police officer, blocked him on the ground by holding his knee on his neck for eight minutes. In a video, Floyd is heard saying to the police officers, “Please, I can’t breathe.”

His death sparked international outrage and mass demonstrations; tens of thousands have since protested in the name of Floyd and other black Americans, including Breonna Taylor, Michael Lorenzo Dean and Tony McDade, all of whom have died at the hands of the police in recent months. According to the Washington Post database, 1,254 blacks have been shot and killed by police since January 1, 2015.

As protests to fight racism continue to take place all over the world – including the United States, the United Kingdom, Italy, Denmark, Germany, Canada and New Zealand – here are four ways to help and support the fight against discrimination.

1. Help raise funds

© Photography Getty Images

You can donate directly to George Floyd Memorial Fund to help Floyd’s family, as well as field organizations in Minnesota, such as the Minnesota Freedom Fund (which helps pay bail bonds), Black Visions Collective (in support of autonomous and safe black communities) and Reclaim The Block (who works for transfer money from the police department to other areas of the city budget).

Alternatively, donations can be made to Black Lives Matter (a global organization that works in the United States, the United Kingdom and Canada to eradicate racism) and Campaign Zero (a group that works to end police violence). Then there are several funds who help hundreds of protesters who have been arrested in the United States.

2. Sign petitions for justice

Protests in San Jose, United States

© Photography Getty Images

Petitions have been instituted to seek justice for George Floyd and other black people killed in recent months, including Breonna Taylor, a 26-year-old woman killed by police during a raid on her apartment in March, Kentucky; Tony McDade, a 38-year-old transgender killed with a gunshot by police in Florida in May; and Michael Lorenzo Dean, a 28-year-old killed by police in Texas in December 2019. It is also possible to sign a petition for justice for 25-year-old Ahmaud Arbery, who was shot dead while jogging in Georgia in February.

Black Lives Matter has also launched one countryside to ask to remove the funds from the police in the United States and to turn the investments on the black communities.

3. Inquire

Murals in honor of George Floyd in Minneapolis

© Photography Getty Images

It is not for blacks to educate whites about racism. You can read anti-racist books, like Me and White Supremacy by Layla Saad; How to Be an Antiracist by Ibram X Kendi; Why I’m No Longer Talking to White People About Race by Reni Eddo-Lodge; Freedom is a constant struggle by Angela Davis.
You can then listen to podcasts including Kimberlé Crenshaw’s Intersectionality Matters, Crissle West’s Kid Fury and The Read and the New York Times project 1619. And follow black activists on social media including Rachel Cargle, founder of The Great Unlearn, Rachel Cargle and black trans model Munroe Bergdorf

4. Talk and keep working

Equally important is making sure that you use your own voice to condemn racism, whether on social media, in the workplace or with friends and family. Even when #BlackLivesMatter isn’t trending on social media.

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