High-Performance Face Masks for Fog-Free Skiing and Snowboarding

High-Performance Face Masks: Now ubiquitous, a year ago there was only one place that a face mask didn’t seem out of place: Ski Hill. Neck tubes, masks, gears and balletclaves have always been part of the uniform on the slope. COVID made them mandatory.

“No one would be allowed up the mountain without covering a face,” said Rob Katz, CEO of Wall Resorts, which operates 37 hills in North America and Australia.

COVID safety plans have been announced at just about every ski resort across the country, including taking anything from nose to chin in lift lines, loading and riding lifts across all lines and during lessons. The only place you feel cold against your face is slipping this season.

Actually covering a face on the slope means slightly less obvious. Most resorts are unspecified, but Utah’s Fear Valley Resort says single-layer face coverings are not very good. Summit County Public Health, the local authority, requires two-layer face coverings with no vents or valves.

The second thing is that of fog. Tuck most of the neck warmers under a goggle and you may not see this many and many more. New designs come out directly, so this is not a problem.

For all those whose ski tubes are not up for the extra demands this winter, here are three options that will not leave you constantly adjusted, blind, or worse, when a red zone move in your gondola will let tourists hold their breath.

Best if you are often hot or COVID-noid

Buff filter tube

Buff took his popular neck tube and added a filter pocket to create the safest neck warm strip on the slope. Move one of the three-layer, replaceable, paper-like filters included in the pocket and it will remove 98 percent of bacteria and more COVID viruses from any other neck warmer on its own. While retaining moisture from the goggles, it is difficult to breathe through the filter, yet the channels release breath. (The box for the Buff Replacement filter sells separately.) The neck tube is one of the lighter of the buff. It is form-fitting, made of recycled polyester, so it stays in place above the nose, and is ideal for light, hot days, or for skiers and riders running hot. [$29; buffusa.com]

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Best if you want new glasses too

Anon M4 Goggle Toric + MFI Face Mask
We have been matching goggles and helmets to ensure inter-free integration over the years. With M4, you can also do this to prevent holes in virus filtration. The M4 relies on four magnets to hold the lens on the goggle frame and, more importantly, makes it easier to swap them when clouds roll. Still the same – it comes with an extra lens and the lower magnets are doubled. Retention for MFI Face Mask. The magnets are also hidden in its upper edge, which is in the Goggle shape. Pull the goggles up or mask up and both fit together (and secretly) on their own. The light material acts like a chimney on the mouth to prevent fogging. The mask, which is also available on its own, is also slightly loose-molded, creating a small air pocket around the face. [$300; burton.com]

Best if you hate tight-fitting face masks

Serious Mask Winter Face MaskVirus EVO Arc Dynamax Dana
Dana combines three techniques to create a safe, warm and easy breathing face tube. It is made of Dynamax, is an insulating, venting and wind-blocking fabric, and is shaped like an EVO arc mask of the serous, with a contour shape that keeps the fabric away from the nose and mouth. It also features a proven antimicrobial treatment HeiQ block, applied directly on the fabric to help kill viruses and bacteria upon contact. It also means that it will not start sniffing quickly. The treatment was finished over time, so it is not as effective as a buffed filter, but is more comfortable to wear mask and is perfect for warmer days. [$30; seirus.com]

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