Fashion Italia in May: Fashion Italia and the Fashion Man

Fashion Italia in May: Fashion Italia and the Fashion Man

A conversation

What happens if two magazines, a male and a female, talk to each other, sharing ideas, collaborators, formats and opportunities as a common factor? The project was this: to try to reason without dogma about how much gender, or rather the evolution of its perception, is relevant today for the society in which we live, of which fashion is an effective mirror and sometimes ahead of its time .

Fashion Italia in May: Fashion Italia and the Fashion Man
Fashion Italia in May: Fashion Italia and the Fashion Man

Will polarities – in dressing, writing, photographing – still make sense in the world that awaits us? And will the production cycles of fashion continue to be anchored to the seasonal rhythm of men’s and women’s fashion shows?

So Fashion Italia and the Fashion Man, this month on newsstands together, and their social profiles have become the place of an editorial experiment, a free and light (as far as possible) creative exchange, a frank space in which writers, artists, journalists, photographers have poured their voices, designer. We rummaged through archives and memories, interrogated technology to scrutinize possible new forms of sociality to come.

Four stories, four photographers, eight covers. A game of mirrors straddling the pages of the two magazines, in which identities become liquid, and the clothes that change show that the substance of things does not change. In one of these works, the same girl is seen twice simply, yet different. In the others there are two couples, symmetrical and not. Then a portrait and a self-portrait. Two of two of two of two: different, infinite possibilities.

Giorgio Armani, who through his ideas of style gave strength to women and freed men from ancient rigidity, is told in an interview in two episodes. How different the same story may sound, if he or she says it, you have fun discovering it in the stories of Richard Mason and Jessica Fellowes. Lila Azam Zanganeh delicately addresses a complex issue: what is still acceptable and what is not in the dialogue between the sexes, in the rules of seduction?

It is trivial to say that when this project started, months ago, the world was very different. But as we move, with patience and respect, towards a slow restart, it is important that some topics that dominated the conversation of this industry yesterday are not dismissed.

This obviously applies to sustainability, which already put a strain on the foundations of our sector (there can and must exist a fashion for consuming less but better: but it does not escape how this entails a huge paradigm shift). It applies to the battle in defense of all forms of diversity, which Fashion Italia has proudly led for years. And it applies precisely to the dialogue between genders and to the identity choices of each of us, which by definition must be free, personal and unquestionable. Let’s start talking about it again: they are essential elements to ensure that the new time that awaits us knows how to treasure the mistakes of the past.

Dall’Uomo: cotton trench coat, MSGM; cotton shirt, Versace.

© Alasdair McLellan

(English Text)

A conversation

What happens if a women’s magazine and a men’s magazine enter into a dialogue with each other, pooling their ideas, contributors, formats and opportunities? This was the plan: to try and think undogmatically about the extent to which the gender factor is relevant today for our society, of which fashion is an effective reflection and sometimes ahead of the times.

Will the polarities – in the way we dress, write and photograph – still make sense in the world that awaits us? And will it still be possible for fashion’s production cycles to be anchored in the seasonal rhythm of men’s and women’s shows?

With these questions in mind, Fashion Italia and L’Uomo Fashion, which are on newsstands together this month, have become the place of a publishing experiment, along with their respective social media profiles. They are welcoming a free and easy (as far as possible) creative exchange, providing an open space into which writers, artists, journalists, photographers and designers have poured their voices. We have delved into the archives and memory, and examined technology to search for new possible forms of social relations to come.

Four stories, four photographers, eight covers. In this game of mirrors straddling the pages of the two magazines, identities become fluid, and the changing clothes show that the essence of things doesn’t change. In one of these works, we simply see the same girl twice. In the others we find two couples, symmetrical and asymmetrical. Then there’s a portrait and a self-portrait. Two of two of two of two, revealing different, infinite possibilities.

Giorgio Armani, who with his ideas of style has given strength to women and liberated men from age-old rigidities, talks about himself in a two-part interview. In the short stories by Richard Mason and Jessica Fellowes, we playfully discover how the same story can sound different if told by him or her. Lila Azam Zanganeh delicately tackles a complex issue: what is still and what is no longer acceptable in the dialogue between the sexes, in the rules of seduction?

When this project began a few months ago, the world was obviously a very different place. But as we patiently and respectfully set off towards a slow recovery, it is crucial that we do not brush aside certain topics that are of paramount importance – such as the fight to remove all obstacles hindering gender equality, and the commitment to constantly support the choices of identity made by each and every one of us, which by definition must be free, personal and incontestable. Let’s get back to talking about these things. They are vital elements to make sure that the new age that awaits us will be able to learn from the mistakes of the past.

On the cover Kaia Gerber photographed by Karim Sadli. Styling Max Pearmain

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