Home / Health Tips / The 3rd World Obesity Day will take place on 11th October 2017

The 3rd World Obesity Day will take place on 11th October 2017

The 3rd World Obesity Day will take place on 11th October 2017

New Statistics indicate the Yearly cost of treating the Effects of obesity will reach US$13 billion in India by 2025

Obesity-related ailments like heart disease, diabetes, liver disorder, depression and several kinds of cancer may cost India an estimated US$12.7 billion annually by 2025

World Obesity Day
Authorities are advised to prioritize investment in tackling obesity by investing today in obesity therapy services, early prevention, and intervention.

World Obesity Federation

On World Obesity Day, the World Obesity Federation and international health leaders, such as the Lancet and the World Health Organization, glow on shocking expenses and continued the effect of obesity, such as fresh data demonstrating the continuing increase in childhood obesity as well as the fiscal consequences of untreated obesity in any way ages.

Untreated, obesity is responsible for a substantial percentage of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, liver disease and various sorts of cancer. The international annual medical cost of handling these critical effects of obesity is predicted to reach US$1.2 trillion each year from 2025[1]. In India that the yearly cost of treating the impacts is estimated to achieve US$13 billion or accumulative expenses of US$90 billion between now and 2025.

World Health Organization

The World Obesity Federation data illustrates how investing in the prevention, early intervention, and treatment for obesity is a cost-effective activity for authorities and wellness services. Investment may also help to attain the 2025 goals determined by the World Health Organization to stop the increase in obesity and also to attain a 25% comparative decrease in mortality in NCDs. The World Obesity Federation are utilizing World Obesity Day, 11th October, to urge authorities, health service providers, carriers and philanthropic organizations to prioritize investment in tackling obesity. This implies 1) investing in therapy services to encourage individuals affected by obesity, 2) early intervention to enhance the achievement of therapy and 3) avoidance to decrease the demand for therapy.

Obesity is now a global outbreak

The President of the World Obesity Federation, Professor Ian Caterson, stated, “Obesity is now a global outbreak which absorbs a huge quantity of their healthcare resources. The yearly health benefits of treating the effects of obesity like diabetes and heart disease is really alarming. We’re utilizing World Obesity Day this past year to accent the cost-savings of handling obesity today instead of waiting to take care of the co-morbidities later. Continual surveillance from World Obesity has demonstrated how obesity incidence has increased dramatically over the last ten decades and having an estimated 177 million adults suffering severe obesity by 2025, it’s apparent that physicians will need to act now to decrease this burden in their national markets.”

Johanna Ralston, Chief Executive Officer of the World Obesity Federation stated, “Addressing obesity today instead of treating the consequences will be clearly likely to become lifesaving and cost-saving, and also an effective way for authorities to satisfy their NCD aims. There’s currently a real urgency to incorporate obesity services into international health care programmes. The World Obesity Federation is here to assist authorities to fulfill this challenge.”

Global World Obesity Day

World Health

On World Obesity Day, the Lancet will soon be releasing new quotes of child and teenage tendencies in obesity and undernourishment, generated from the World Health. “We hope to find that child obesity is still climbing in low-income and low nations, together with the sheer numbers of obese children anticipated to exceed the numbers of undernourished children over the upcoming few decades”, stated Dr Tim Lobstein in the World Obesity Federation. “If that is borne out, then development and government agencies will need to handle undernutrition whilst at the same time tackling obesity, also will require ‘double-duty’ policies to give the ideal nutrition for healthier growth.”

World Obesity Day advice

The 3rd World Obesity Day will take place on 11th October 2017. It’s been established to stimulate and support practical activities which will help people attain and maintain a healthy weight and reverse the global obesity crisis.

Tables (India figures)

 

Table 1 – Percentage of adults living with obesity (BMI > 30kg/m2) in 2014 and 2015

India

2014

2025

Male

2.3%

3.1%

Female

5.2%

6.9%

Source: World Obesity Federation

 

Table 2 – The annual cost of the consequences of not treating obesity. US$ at 2014 value, adjusted for purchasing power parity

 

2025

India

US$12.70 billion

Source: World Obesity Federation

 

Table 3 – The 9-year cumulative cost of the consequences of not treating obesity. US$ at 2014 value, adjusted for purchasing power parity

 

2017-2025

India

US$89.94 billion

Source: World Obesity Federation

 

Tables (country data and global figures)

 

Table 4 – Estimated percentage of adults living with obesity (BMI > 30kg/m2) in 2014 and 2015

2014

2025

United States

34%

41%

Egypt

31%

37%

Australia

28%

34%

Mexico

28%

34%

Malta

27%

32%

United Kingdom

27%

34%

South Africa

27%

32%

Germany

21%

25%

Brazil

21%

25%

Colombia

20%

25%

Source: World Obesity Federation

 

Table 5 – The annual cost of the consequences of not treating obesity. US$ at 2014 value, adjusted for purchasing power parity

 

2014

2025

United States

$325 bn

$555 bn

Egypt

$3.9 bn

$7.8 bn

Australia

$9.0 bn

$17.0 bn

Mexico

$10.2 bn

$20.7 bn

Malta

$115 m

$206 m

United Kingdom

$19bn

$30.6 bn

South Africa

$4.4 bn

$8.6 bn

Germany

$31.3 bn

$50.2 bn

Brazil

$16.6 bn

$34.4 bn

Colombia

$2.7 bn

$5.7 bn

Worldwide

US$600 bn

US$1.2 trillion

 

Table 6 – The 9-year cumulative cost of the consequences of not treating obesity. US$ at 2014 value, adjusted for purchasing power parity

 

2017-2025

United States

$4.2 trn

Egypt

$58 bn

Australia

$127 bn

Mexico

$152 bn

Malta

$1.5 bn

United Kingdom

$237 bn

South Africa

$63 bn

Germany

$390 bn

Brazil

$251 bn

Colombia

$42 bn

Worldwide

$9.1 trn

Source: World Obesity Federation

 

Table 7 – Cost of treating and preventing obesity to reduce prevalence by 5 percentage points over the period 2017-2025. US$ 2014 value, adjusted for purchasing power parity

United States

$37 bn

Egypt

$2.7 bn

Australia

$3.3 bn

Mexico

$6.5 bn

Malta

$34 m

United Kingdom

$8.1 bn

South Africa

$2.2 bn

Germany

$8.9 bn

Brazil

$12.2 bn

Colombia

$2.1 bn

Worldwide

$361 bn

Source: World Obesity Federation



[1] WOD 2017 data. World Obesity Federation projections.

For more information:

Email: WOD@worldobesity.org

Website: http://www.obesityday.worldobesity.org

Twitter: @worldobesity #WorldObesityDay

Thunderclap: https://www.thunderclap.it/projects/60935-world-obesity-day

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